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Is there a difference between a real and a digital conversation? It is such an incisive question that we can't cough up easy answers. What matters more than the digital 'gimmicry' as such, are the ways in which we embed our humanness and individuality and autobiographical timbre in online utterances. Precisely because digitization as such is highly conducive to stereotypical slurs, woke nonsense, and mass [re-]packagiing of trivia...

Humour is probably fake news, even conviviality morphs into a 'derivative' if we lazily - 'graciously' even - allow it to happen AND to shrink our hippocampuses in one go.. As a writer, I think backbone is more supportive of our natural [i.e. nature-nourished] selves than our wordings or conceits. At the same tine, I am a Luddite when it comes to language.... an inconsistency formerly known as a paradox.

Let our pens be our pitchforks!

Leave your (their) chatDTP devices to rot!

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Hey Mattias, This question is a bit off topic. Do you have any insight into the phenomenon of mask wearing v. personal and societal accountability, rude behavior, lack of empathy and disconnection. From my observation it appeared to accelerate the negative mass formation. I haven't heard you speak about this, and I was wondering if you had deeper insight.

Thanks

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Hi Jason, no, I never focussed on that topic. And as far as I know, no studies have been published about it. Should you find one, please let me know ...

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Incredibly insightful and thought provoking piece. Thank you for sharing your exceptional knowledge & perceptions. Mattias you are an ingenious thinker. Again, the comments on your Substack are also a fabulous trove of informative viewpoints! I thoroughly enjoy reading each one. I am looking forward to obtaining a copy of Hannah Arendt's book The Human Condition. While I am not as interested in political philosophy as I am the neuroscience of human psychology, I am intrigued by the comments to read this stimulating book which has clearly provoked contemplation of our modern human condition by those who've read it. It is interesting indeed to witness radical shifts in our current society. A metamorphosis of unproductive freedom in the last few years post Corona, to enslavement in what amounts to nothing. Nothing but self imposed isolation within mass consumption of a digitalized life by far too many. Personally, I love to chat or exchange a smile with those in line at the grocery store, fellow Tai Chi participants, or a passersby on the sidewalk. I do my best to make an effort to retain & share my humanity to make a meaningful difference even in the smallest of ways as a smile. I hope that I do not lose my will to participate in an authentic life even as current inhumanity presses upon the masses. Cheers to all who strive to do the same in their own way as we participate in continued learning & critical thinking spurred on by wonderful writers on this platform, including Mattias Desmet!

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I can't forget life as I have - and have aspired to - live it, although various supranational entities have been aspiring to curb it for decades. And it was quite a shock to discover that the environmental movement had been hoodwinking us (me...) for decades (by way of the Al Gore-Maurice Strong-Dennis Meadows etc "triad").

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It's not these persons/bureaucrats per se; it's the ocean of boredom, signal-virtues, and sheer dullness they've inflicted on us, perhaps even at our own bidding, routinely, indeed well-nigh unconsciously. Much like the Klamm-character in The Castle (Franz Kafka) - almost a cipher, yet exuding some weird sort of spell-binding 'authority' or raw power.

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Please…… Help Fight Against the Sale of Children for the Purpose of Sex Trafficking and Child Pornography

1. Watch this entire trailer……

2. Go see this movie when it opens on July 4th, and………

3. Consider Paying it Forward

The Sound of Freedom

https://www.angel.com/pay-it-forward/sound-of-freedom

This is a true story. I watched an hour long interview with Tim Ballard, the subject of this movie, and Jim Caviezel. Tim quit his job as a Department of Homeland Security Special Agent so that he could literally, 'save the kids'.

He is 'The Real Deal'. Jim Caviezel is the actor who plays him in this movie.

These men are literally doing 'God's Work', Tim, by performing this work, and Jim by shining a light on this literal EVIL that is among us. For instance, at my workplace, two men were fired and incarcerated within the last 6 months for child pornography. That happened because they were 'incautious' enought to watch it on a government computer. Think of how many are watching on their private computers, and don't get caught. This is a huge problem worldwide, and our country is a primary contributor to this (no other word for it but)…….. Pure Evil.

We have a moral obligation to do what we can to fight against this….

Please help.

Please take a material step and stand up for goodness, on this Independence Day.

Thank you, Elizabeth

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The Rhythm that is Life itself will move as a pendulum swinging as far opposite from where we are now. The movement will be upward & go far beyond the point of expectations. It has to - it's a law. Some will call it a Miracle. but it's really natural. I think that the miraculous is simply the law of Good that Humanity has lost sight of & needs to recognize again.

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My wise father had given me "The Man and Society", authored by Maria Benedita Lima De La Torre - written in 1977 - who goes along with Doctor Desmet's explanations concerning mass formation/controlling and its role in the Covid pandemia plot.

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It's ironic that they create "loneliness" through their insane pandemic policies and then issue advisories "on the dangers of loneliness combined with a new “National Strategy to Advance Social Connection.”

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Cheers!!! Duly noted; and note made. Uhhhh…reasonable discourse…What a wild concept…Uhhh…I might learn something. Ed

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I found I am a lot less alone when I know what's really happening and who are my friends and enemies.

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Indeed, massive lies end up in joylessness, or worse.

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Amazing piece. I was wishing someone could pull this together during the lockdown panic.

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I found beauty everywhere! I loved every crack in the sidewalks. I loved those water towers that sit on top of buildings in Queens. I loved the rooftops. I loved the subway tracks. I loved the awesome encompassing ring of buildings all around Bryant Park. I loved the amazing patterns of the bricks on older buildings... I could go on and on and on. Where I live now everything is manicured.. it's safe, it's pretty and it's boring. New York was never manicured, and never boring. Don't know how things are there now - it sounds like my city has been pretty well destroyed. Talk about loneliness. I've lost my wonderful city and I'll never see my friends again.

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I feel You. My safety net is a skydive. If I ever go seriously sideways, that’s the very place I’m headed. If I remember correctly in a business plan I wrote, there were 42 fatalities out of 5.27 million skydives worldwide. It will indeed cheer You up. One of My Friends is now at 20,000 skydives. There is still, with all the abundant challenges and frustration, absolute beauty in Our world. Ed

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While the general thrust of this article is fine and makes sense, the author's keenness to blame it all on the Enlightenment (which he also shows in his book 'the Psychology of Totalitarianism') jars with me.

It seems to me that it was precisely the Enlightenment ('Dare To Think') that opened the door to our escape from the totalitarianism of religious dogma. Here in Scotland we had suffered 1000 years of Christian dogma - first Catholic then strict Protestant. A student was hanged in 1699 for blasphemy after questioning the existence of God. It was only when these shackles were loosened that people were able to develop science, engineering and medicine.

The post-modern view that technology is evil is the root of the cult of climate change and much other modern wokery. Science and Technology can be a force for good or for evil but we can choose which.

It's because we have abandoned the lessons of the Enlightenment that we are taking the latter course.

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Technology, or the application of science, invariably starts out as a force for good, but throughout history has always been weaponised to gain profit and control over the masses.

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Which begs too many questions to sum up.

Technology is NOT technoCRACY, and the WEF (etc) also dabbles in an obscurantism of sorts, these gremia tap into human inventiveness to gain control.

Man-made creationism without creativity.

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The Enlightenment certainly sparked a drive towards freedom of expression and independent thinking. But the dark side of it is the mechanistic view of the world, and if I understand Mattias correctly, it is this dark side he is warning us of. This mechanistic view in fact goes against the core values of the Enlightenment, even if it springs from it, for its logical conclusion must be the annihilation of humanity as we know it, a world of atomized individuals, as for example described by Houllebecq in his novel "La Possibilité d'une île" (a book I strongly recommend to all who wish to gain a deeper understanding of our current situation). The only way I see out of this situation is a renewed focus on the core values of the Enlightenment, as embodied in Kant's call to arms: Sapere Aude! I know many want to turn to religion now, but this is misguided; replacing one addiction with another solves nothing, and just as you rightly point out, religion can easily turn into totalitarian dogma.

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My reading of the word 'mechanistic' as used by Mattias Desmet is a tendency to opt for one-size-fits-all diagnoses and solutions. This seems to be the credo of the modern technocrat and I agree its universal application is toxic to our society and culture.

I believe the industrial revolution would have happened without the Enlightenment, maybe a little slower. Yes, mass production changed the structure of our society - and adversely for those who moved for work from their agrarian life to the city slums - but it also clothed and fed the world. Its success in terms of health, wealth and life expectancy is what I believe has led to the technocratic mindset.

I strongly agree that "a renewed focus on the core values of the Enlightenment" is the best way to go for everyone's sake. However, I don't see that happening. I'm rather afraid we're condemned to repeat the worst aspects of history in a new Dark Age.

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I like and cannot like Your posts. It would be fascinating to sit down with You with coffee/tea, lunch or pint and have a deep discussion. My mind might hurt; but, so would Yours. 😁 Very Best, Ed

I may venture to the River Spey. I might track You down. I’m a stalker (sarcasm). 🤣

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Well I live in Dumfries, which is on the river Nith (sometimes under it) at the other end of Scotland but you're welcome to meet up for a chat.

I encourage you to write up your views in your substack so that I and others can see what you think.

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So you're suffering from digital depression and the solution is to talk with an AI robot, which is a digital creation. The irony of it all.

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Question: Who’d like to join me in funneling toward reinforcing a solution to this? Via renewing #zerocrime villages/communities since the dawn of civilization in Java, Indonesia and expanding the notion to more of the empathy, motherness, families and nature loving world.

#SpiceTradeAsia_Prompts

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